Last edited by Maulmaran
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of The great fire of Rome found in the catalog.

The great fire of Rome

Stephen Dando-Collins

The great fire of Rome

the fall of an emperor and his city

by Stephen Dando-Collins

  • 241 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Da Capo Press in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementStephen Dando-Collins
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDG285.3 .D36 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24468112M
ISBN 109780306818905
LC Control Number2010013443
OCLC/WorldCa548569622

Among all the natural disasters that struck Rome, one of the most well-known is the Great Fire of Rome, in part due to the popular myth that Emperor Nero fiddled while the Eternal City burned, even though no fiddle existed in first century Rome. Suetonius and Cassius Dio, two of Nero's ancient. In 64 AD, on the night of J a fire began beneath the stands of Rome’s great stadium, the Circus Maximus. The fire would spread over the coming days to engulf much of the city of Rome. From this calamity, one of the ancient world’s most devastating events, legends grew: that Nero had been responsible for the fire, and fiddled while Rome burned, and that Nero blamed the Christians of.

Buy The Great Fire of Rome First Edition by Dando-Collins, Stephen (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(13). See Main Page for a guide to all contents of all sections. A guide to Roman websites which assesses the other "megasites". RomanSites is also especially good at keeping track of changes in URLs. The best guide to Roman site web projects. From Herodotus and Livy. Book 6: 11, , 27, , , 39; Book 7: 19, , 27, 29, 38,

With as many as minor fires breaking out every day in ancient Rome during the summer months, perhaps the Great Fire of Rome was the fault neither of Nero or the Christians after all, but a result of the poorly constructed wooden tenement buildings that covered much of the city. These building certainly allowed the fire to spread more rapidly.   On the evening of J in the scorching summer of 64 CE, a fire started in a shop under the Circus Maximus in Rome. The fire quickly spread to .


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The great fire of Rome by Stephen Dando-Collins Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City Dando-Collins aims to fill what he sees as a void of historical compilations of the Great fire of Rome in A.D. 64 and its consequences for Emperor Nero. The book is not greatly detailed, it focuses pretty narrowly on a four-year period/5(25).

The Great Fire of Rome was an urban fire that occurred in July, 64 AD. The fire began in the merchant shops around Rome's chariot stadium, Circus Maximus, on the night of July After six days, the fire was brought under control, but before the damage could be measured, the fire reignited and burned for another three days.

The great fire of Rome The great fire of Rome book out and destroys much of the city on this day in the year Despite the well-known stories, there is no evidence that the Roman emperor, Nero, either started the.

The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City - Kindle edition by Dando-Collins, Stephen. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City/5(19).

In The Great Fire of Rome, Dando-Collins takes readers through the streets of ancient Rome, where unrest simmers, and into the imperial palace, where political intrigue seethes, relating a pot-boiler story filled with fascinating historical characters who will determine the course of an empire.

It is an unforgettable human drama that brings /5(20). On the night of J AD 64, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome's great stadium, the Circus Maximus. For more than a week the fire spread, engulfing most of the city and nearly burning it to the ground.

With its capital in ruins, Rome's powerful empire teetered on the edge of collapse as Nero struggled desperately to save his empire and his The Great Fire of Rome, Dando /5(3). In The Great Fire of Rome, Joseph J. Walsh tells the true story of this deadly episode in Rome's history.

The great fire of Rome book explains why Rome was such a vulnerable tinderbox, outlines the difficulties of life in that exciting and dangerous city, and recounts the fire's aftermath and legacy—a legacy that includes the transformation of much of ancient Rome.

The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City Stephen Dando-Collins, Da Capo, $25 (p) ISBN More By and About This Author. In The Great Fire of Rome, Dando-Collins takes readers through the streets of ancient Rome, where unrest simmers, and into the imperial palace, where political intrigue seethes, relating a pot-boiler story filled with fascinating historical characters who will determine the course of an empire.

It is an unforgettable human drama that brings. Either way, the Great Fire of Rome permanently tarnished Nero’s reign, and it ultimately helped bring about the downfall that ended with the Roman emperor committing suicide just a few years later in 68 A.D.

The Great Fire of Rome chronicles the most famous fire to strike the Roman Empire, and the important aftermath of the damage it caused.4/5(7). In this new book Stephen Dando-Collins (from hereon ‘D-C’) unsurprisingly tells the story of Nero and The Great Fire of Rome.

Drawing on some of the revisionist history of the recent past, D-C defies the old, traditional interpretation that Nero set the fire and then blamed the Christians. “This book explores that fateful (for Rome, at least) night of July 19 in the y when a blaze began beneath the Circus Maximus—ancient Rome's version of Madison Square Garden.”9/22 “Nero and the Great Fire of Rome is a tale that begs to be told; it is a heck of a good story It is entertaining.

It moves quickly 4/4(4). Today marks the anniversary of the beginning of the Great Fire of Rome. The origins of the fire and its course have been the subject of considerable controversy because there were only two eye witnesses who have written anything about it: the historian Tacitus, who was 9 years old at the time, and Pliny the Elder who mentions it in passing (using it merely as a benchmark to indicate the age of.

The Great Fire of Rome is said to have “deprived numerous families of their homes and caused widespread discontent.”[3] It is widely accepted that the fire was created by Caesar Nero (A.D.

), and that he blamed the Christians for this crime (Tacitus [ca. ], Annals ).[4]. A crumpled iron gate, melted by the force of Rome’s great fire. History has blamed Nero for the disaster, implying that he started the fire so that he could bypass the senate and rebuild Rome to.

The Great Fire of Rome. Brief overview of the events surrounding the Great Fire of Rome. In a hot July summer of 64 A.D., a fire broke out near the Capena Gate (the marketplace near the Circus Maximus) and spread quickly across the entire Circus, and finally it was completely out of control, the fire destroyed nearly half of Rome.

"Distinctive in The Great Fire of Rome are the ways in which Walsh uses each aspect of the fire and its aftermath to explore themes from Roman imperial topography to the social structures of the city's inhabitants to the early history of the Roman Christian community.

In lively and accessible prose, he displays commendable sympathy for the plight of the ordinary Romans caught up in the. The Great Fire of Rome audiobook, by Stephen Dando-Collins In 64 AD, on the night of J a fire began beneath the stands of Rome’s great stadium, the Circus Maximus.

The fire would spread over the coming days to engulf much of the city of Rome. From this calamity, one of the ancient world’s most devastating events, legends grew: that Nero had been.

The greatest threat to Nero’s reign, however, was the Great Fire, which began on J 64 AD and lasted for six days. It should be pointed out that by this time, Peter and Paul had likely been dead for over two years.

Save for some minor sketchy details, the Great Fire of Rome is fairly well chronicled. On the night of 7/19/64, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome's great stadium, the Circus Maximus. For more than a week the fire spread, engulfing most of the city, nearly burning it to the.

"The Great Fire of Rome" opens at the beginning of A.D. 64 and follows the events in Rome and nearby as they unfold in the seven months leading up to the great fire. As the year progresses we learn that the infamous young emperor Nero, who was twenty-six at the time of .The great fire of Rome, painting by Karl Theodor von Piloty Nero ingratiated himself with the public offering games and perks, but he despised the Senate.

For the senators, on the other hand, it was a sacrilege that the emperor appeared in public singing and making music.The Great Fire of Rome opens at the beginning of 64 AD and follows the events in Rome and nearby as they unfold in the seven months leading up to the great fire. As the year progresses we learn that the infamous young emperor Nero, who was twenty-six at the time of .